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Long term nutritional intake and the risk for non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD): A population based study

  • Author Footnotes
    † This work was performed in partial fulfillment of the requirements for a Ph.D. degree, Sackler Faculty of Medicine, Tel Aviv University, Israel.
    Shira Zelber-Sagi
    Footnotes
    † This work was performed in partial fulfillment of the requirements for a Ph.D. degree, Sackler Faculty of Medicine, Tel Aviv University, Israel.
    Affiliations
    The Liver Unit, Department of Gastroenterology, Tel Aviv Sourasky Medical Center, Tel Aviv 64239, Israel

    The Food and Nutrition Administration, Ministry of Health, 2 Ben Tabai St. Jerusalem, Israel
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  • Dorit Nitzan-Kaluski
    Affiliations
    The Sackler Faculty of Medicine, Tel-Aviv University, Tel Aviv 69978, Israel

    The Food and Nutrition Administration, Ministry of Health, 2 Ben Tabai St. Jerusalem, Israel
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  • Rebecca Goldsmith
    Affiliations
    The Sackler Faculty of Medicine, Tel-Aviv University, Tel Aviv 69978, Israel
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  • Muriel Webb
    Affiliations
    The Liver Unit, Department of Gastroenterology, Tel Aviv Sourasky Medical Center, Tel Aviv 64239, Israel
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  • Laurie Blendis
    Affiliations
    The Liver Unit, Department of Gastroenterology, Tel Aviv Sourasky Medical Center, Tel Aviv 64239, Israel
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  • Zamir Halpern
    Affiliations
    The Liver Unit, Department of Gastroenterology, Tel Aviv Sourasky Medical Center, Tel Aviv 64239, Israel

    The Food and Nutrition Administration, Ministry of Health, 2 Ben Tabai St. Jerusalem, Israel
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  • Ran Oren
    Correspondence
    Corresponding author. Tel.: +972 3 6973984; fax: +972 3 6974622.
    Affiliations
    The Liver Unit, Department of Gastroenterology, Tel Aviv Sourasky Medical Center, Tel Aviv 64239, Israel

    The Food and Nutrition Administration, Ministry of Health, 2 Ben Tabai St. Jerusalem, Israel
    Search for articles by this author
  • Author Footnotes
    † This work was performed in partial fulfillment of the requirements for a Ph.D. degree, Sackler Faculty of Medicine, Tel Aviv University, Israel.
Published:August 15, 2007DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jhep.2007.06.020

      Background/Aims

      Weight loss is considered therapeutic for patients with NAFLD. However, there is no epidemiological evidence that dietary habits are associated with NAFLD. Dietary patterns associated with primary NAFLD were investigated.

      Methods

      A cross-sectional study of a sub-sample (n = 375) of the Israeli National Health and Nutrition Survey. Exclusion criteria were any known etiology for secondary NAFLD. Participants underwent an abdominal ultrasound, biochemical tests, dietary and anthropometric evaluations. A semi-quantitative food-frequency questionnaire was administered.

      Results

      After exclusion, 349 volunteers (52.7% male, mean age 50.7 ± 10.4, 30.9% primary NAFLD) were included. The NAFLD group consumed almost twice the amount of soft drinks (P = 0.03) and 27% more meat (P < 0.001). In contrast, the NAFLD group consumed somewhat less fish rich in omega-3 (P = 0.056). Adjusting for age, gender, BMI and total calories, intake of soft drinks and meat was significantly associated with an increased risk for NAFLD (OR = 1.45, 1.13–1.85 95% CI and OR = 1.37, 1.04–1.83 95% CI, respectively).

      Conclusions

      NAFLD patients have a higher intake of soft drinks and meat and a tendency towards a lower intake of fish rich in omega-3. Moreover, a higher intake of soft drinks and meat is associated with an increased risk of NAFLD, independently of age, gender, BMI and total calories.

      Keywords

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