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Fatty liver in adolescents: Mechanisms, clinical features and therapy

  • Valerio Nobili
    Correspondence
    Corresponding author. Address: Head of Hepato-Metabolic Disease Unit, “Bambino Gesu” Children’s Hospital IRCCS, P.le S. Onofrio, 4, 00165 Rome, Italy. Tel.: +39 06 68592192.
    Affiliations
    Liver Unit, “Bambino Gesù” Children’s Hospital and Research Institute, Rome, Italy
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  • Ariel E. Feldstein
    Affiliations
    Department of Pediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition, Rady Children’s Hospital, University of California San Diego (UCSD), San Diego, CA, USA
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Published:October 11, 2016DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jhep.2016.07.036
      Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is currently the most common cause of chronic liver disease in children. It has been estimated that 7% of children in Western countries are affected by NAFLD and this percentage reaches up to 80% in the obese population. This increasing prevalence is essentially due to unhealthy diet and sedentary lifestyle and has translated into a significant increase in the prevalence of NAFLD in adolescence and young adults [
      • Mrad Abou
      • et al.
      The increasing burden of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease among young adults in the United States: a growing epidemic.
      ]. Moreover both children and adolescents with NAFLD may develop end-stage liver disease with the consequent need for liver transplantation [
      • Feldstein A.E.
      • Charatcharoenwitthaya P.
      • Treeprasertsuk S.
      • Benson J.T.
      • Enders F.B.
      • Angulo P.
      The natural history of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease in children: a follow-up study for up to 20 years.
      ].
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