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NAFLD and cancer: More cause for concern?

  • Peter Jepsen
    Correspondence
    Corresponding author. Address: Department of Hepatology and Gastroenterology, Aarhus University Hospital, Nørrebrogade 44, DK-8000 Aarhus C, Denmark. Tel.: +45 7846 2800; fax: +45 7846 2860.
    Affiliations
    Department of Hepatology and Gastroenterology, Aarhus University Hospital, Aarhus, Denmark

    Department of Clinical Epidemiology, Aarhus University Hospital, Aarhus, Denmark
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  • Federica Turati
    Affiliations
    Department of Clinical Sciences and Community Health, University of Milan, 20133 Milan, Italy
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  • Carlo La Vecchia
    Affiliations
    Department of Clinical Sciences and Community Health, University of Milan, 20133 Milan, Italy
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Published:October 20, 2017DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jhep.2017.10.008
      Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is likely to become the most prevalent liver disease in many countries,
      • Armstrong M.J.
      • Houlihan D.D.
      • Bentham L.
      • Shaw J.C.
      • Cramb R.
      • Olliff S.
      • et al.
      Presence and severity of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease in a large prospective primary care cohort.
      • Younossi Z.
      • Anstee Q.M.
      • Marietti M.
      • Hardy T.
      • Henry L.
      • Eslam M.
      • et al.
      Global burden of NAFLD and NASH: Trends, predictions, risk factors and prevention.
      yet clinicians are struggling to determine exactly why they should care about NAFLD. Is it merely a bystander – a manifestation of the metabolic syndrome resulting in cardiovascular disease – or is it a liver disease in its own right?
      • Byrne C.D.
      • Targher G.
      NAFLD: A multisystem disease.

      Linked Article

      • Association between non-alcoholic fatty liver disease and cancer incidence rate
        Journal of HepatologyVol. 68Issue 1
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          Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is one of the most common chronic liver diseases globally, with an estimated prevalence of 25.2%.1 NAFLD may progress to non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH), cirrhosis, and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC).1–3 Moreover, NAFLD is strongly associated with insulin resistance, the metabolic syndrome, diabetes, and cardiovascular disease, indicating that NAFLD is a multisystem disease with extrahepatic complications.4–6
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