Advertisement

The impact of coffee consumption on fibrosis and steatosis in HIV-HCV co-infected patients

  • Maria Patrizia Carrieri
    Correspondence
    Corresponding author. Address: Aix Marseille Univ, INSERM, IRD, SESSTIM, Sciences Economiques & Sociales de la Santé & Traitement de l’Information Médicale, Marseille, France. Tel.: +33 620 425047.
    Affiliations
    Aix Marseille Univ, INSERM, IRD, SESSTIM, Sciences Economiques & Sociales de la Santé & Traitement de l’Information Médicale, Marseille, France

    ORS PACA, Observatoire régional de la santé Provence-Alpes-Côte d’Azur, Marseille, France
    Search for articles by this author
  • Camelia Protopopescu
    Affiliations
    Aix Marseille Univ, INSERM, IRD, SESSTIM, Sciences Economiques & Sociales de la Santé & Traitement de l’Information Médicale, Marseille, France

    ORS PACA, Observatoire régional de la santé Provence-Alpes-Côte d’Azur, Marseille, France
    Search for articles by this author
  • Fabienne Marcellin
    Affiliations
    Aix Marseille Univ, INSERM, IRD, SESSTIM, Sciences Economiques & Sociales de la Santé & Traitement de l’Information Médicale, Marseille, France

    ORS PACA, Observatoire régional de la santé Provence-Alpes-Côte d’Azur, Marseille, France
    Search for articles by this author
  • Linda Wittkop
    Affiliations
    Univ. Bordeaux, ISPED, Inserm, Bordeaux Population Health Research Center, Team MORPH3EUS, UMR 1219, CIC-EC 1401, F-33000 Bordeaux, France

    CHU de Bordeaux, Pôle de santé publique, Service d’information médicale, F-33000 Bordeaux, France
    Search for articles by this author
  • Karine Lacombe
    Affiliations
    Infectious Diseases Unit, St Antoine Hospital, Paris, France

    Institut Pierre-Louis de Santé Publique, Inserm UMR-S1136 Sorbonne-Universités, Paris VI, France
    Search for articles by this author
  • Laure Esterle
    Affiliations
    Univ. Bordeaux, ISPED, Inserm, Bordeaux Population Health Research Center, Team MORPH3EUS, UMR 1219, CIC-EC 1401, F-33000 Bordeaux, France
    Search for articles by this author
  • Philippe Sogni
    Affiliations
    Service Maladies infectieuses et tropicales, AP-HP, Hôpital Cochin, Paris, France

    Université Paris Descartes, UMR-S1016, Paris, France
    Search for articles by this author
  • Dominique Salmon-Ceron
    Affiliations
    Service Maladies infectieuses et tropicales, AP-HP, Hôpital Cochin, Paris, France

    Université Paris Descartes, UMR-S1016, Paris, France
    Search for articles by this author
  • theANRS CO13 HEPAVIH Study Group
    Author Footnotes
    † Please consult supplementary information for details regarding the ANRS CO13 HEPAVIH Study Group.
  • Author Footnotes
    † Please consult supplementary information for details regarding the ANRS CO13 HEPAVIH Study Group.
Published:November 02, 2017DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jhep.2017.10.025
      Alferink et al.
      • Alferink L.J.M.
      • Fittipaldi J.
      • Kiefte-de Jong J.C.
      • Taimr P.
      • Hansen B.E.
      • Metselaar H.J.
      • et al.
      Coffee and herbal tea consumption is associated with lower liver stiffness in the general population: the Rotterdam study.
      report novel results regarding the protective effects of coffee and herbal tea consumption on liver stiffness, which is a proxy for liver fibrosis, measured using FibroScan. Their cross-sectional study was nested inside a large population-based cohort of participants aged 45 and older (mean age 66.5 ± 7.4 years) in Rotterdam.

      Linked Article

      • Coffee and herbal tea consumption is associated with lower liver stiffness in the general population: The Rotterdam study
        Journal of HepatologyVol. 67Issue 2
        • Preview
          Chronic liver diseases constitute a major public health problem. Liver cirrhosis was the 12th cause of death worldwide and the sixth cause of life-years lost in the adult population in developed countries in 2010.1,2 Chronic liver diseases are often silent for over 20 years until cirrhosis develops. Indeed, several studies have suggested that liver fibrosis may be present within unselected individuals. Using transient elastography (TE) as a diagnostic tool for liver fibrosis, a prevalence of 6–7% was found in the general population3,4 and even up to 17% in those high-risk populations with metabolic syndrome and type 2 diabetes.
        • Full-Text
        • PDF
      To read this article in full you will need to make a payment

      Purchase one-time access:

      Academic & Personal: 24 hour online accessCorporate R&D Professionals: 24 hour online access
      One-time access price info
      • For academic or personal research use, select 'Academic and Personal'
      • For corporate R&D use, select 'Corporate R&D Professionals'

      Subscribe:

      Subscribe to Journal of Hepatology
      Already a print subscriber? Claim online access
      Already an online subscriber? Sign in
      Institutional Access: Sign in to ScienceDirect

      References

        • Alferink L.J.M.
        • Fittipaldi J.
        • Kiefte-de Jong J.C.
        • Taimr P.
        • Hansen B.E.
        • Metselaar H.J.
        • et al.
        Coffee and herbal tea consumption is associated with lower liver stiffness in the general population: the Rotterdam study.
        J Hepatol. 2017; 67: 339-348
        • Carrieri M.P.
        • Protopopescu C.
        • Marcellin F.
        • Rosellini S.
        • Wittkop L.
        • Esterle L.
        • et al.
        Protective effect of coffee consumption on all-cause mortality of French HIV-HCV co-infected patients.
        J Hepatol. 2017; 67: 1157-1167
        • Gunter M.J.
        • Murphy N.
        • Cross A.J.
        • Dossus L.
        • Dartois L.
        • Fagherazzi G.
        • et al.
        Coffee drinking and mortality in 10 European countries: a multinational cohort study.
        Ann Intern Med. 2017; 167: 236-247
        • Sterling R.K.
        • Lissen E.
        • Clumeck N.
        • Sola R.
        • Correa M.C.
        • Montaner J.
        • et al.
        Development of a simple noninvasive index to predict significant fibrosis in patients with HIV/HCV coinfection.
        Hepatology. 2006; 43: 1317-1325
      1. Leading countries by coffee consumption 2015. Available from: https://www.statista.com/statistics/277135/leading-countries-by-coffee-consumption/.

        • Petta S.
        • Marchesini G.
        Coffee and tea breaks for liver health.
        J Hepatol. 2017; 67: 221-223
        • Farah A.
        • de Paulis T.
        • Trugo L.C.
        • Martin P.R.
        Effect of roasting on the formation of chlorogenic acid lactones in coffee.
        J Agric Food Chem. 2005; 53: 1505-1513
        • Xiao Q.
        • Sinha R.
        • Graubard B.I.
        • Freedman N.D.
        Inverse associations of total and decaffeinated coffee with liver enzyme levels in National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 1999–2010.
        Hepatology. 2014; 60: 2091-2098
        • Carrieri M.P.
        • Sogni P.
        • Cohen J.
        • Loko M.A.
        • Winnock M.
        • Spire B.
        • et al.
        Elevated coffee consumption and reduced risk of insulin resistance in HIV-HCV coinfected patients (HEPAVIH ANRS CO-13).
        Hepatology. 2012; 56: 2010
        • De Roos B.
        • Van Tol A.
        • Urgert R.
        • Scheek L.M.
        • Van Gent T.
        • Buytenhek R.
        • et al.
        Consumption of French-press coffee raises cholesteryl ester transfer protein activity levels before LDL cholesterol in normolipidaemic subjects.
        J Intern Med. 2000; 248: 211-216